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[Power Balance]

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PowerBalance sudah mengaku gelang mereka adalah scam.
GelangMagnet AC Kencingtium bila lagi?
Persoalan yang lebih penting lagi, di mana PPIM (Persatuan Pengencing Indera Makmor)?

Tak pasal-pasal PPIM pulak yang kono kekeke.

PowerBalance Admits Their Wristbands Are a Scam
gizmodo.com | Jesus Diaz | jesus@gizmodo.com

I don’t think this would surprise anyone, but PowerBalance—manufacturers of plastic wristbands with hologram stickers on it—have admitted there is “no credible scientific evidence that supports [their] claims and therefore [they] engaged in misleading conduct.” Here’s their statement:

In our advertising we stated that Power Balance wristbands improved your strength, balance and flexibility.

We admit that there is no credible scientific evidence that supports our claims and therefore we engaged in misleading conduct in breach of s52 of the Trade Practices Act 1974.

If you feel you have been misled by our promotions, we wish to unreservedly apologise and offer a full refund.

To obtain a refund please visit our website http://www.powerbalance.com.au or contact us toll-free on 1800 733 436

This offer will be available until 30th June 2011. To be eligible for a refund, together with return postage, you will need to return a genuine Power Balance product along with proof of purchase (including credit card records, store barcodes and receipts) from an authorised reseller in Australia.

This Corrective Notice has been paid for by Power Balance Australia Pty Ltd and placed pursuant to an undertaking to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission given under section 87B of the Trade Practices Act, 1974.

They had to publish that in Australian media. The company has been under attack by consumer associations all over Europe because of their claims and scientific mumbojumbo, but this seems to be the first time in which a regulatory authority have made them admit that their claims are a fraud.

These PowerBalance wristbands remind me of the old magnetic wristbands my grandma used to wear in the 80s. They were able to cure anything, from rheumatism to diabetes, and they made people feel better because the metal vibrated in the same frequency as the planet does, whatever that means. Of course, these pseudo-scientific amulets have been made and distributed since the beginning of time, from “magic” stones to sanctified pendants made of holy chicken bones. These are just fancier versions of those, used by a new generation of gullible people.

Personally, I will keep using my magic Monster Cable necklace to keep my strength, balance and flexibility at their good old crappy levels. [PowerBalance]

 

Power Balance wristbands a sham: ACCC
smh.com.au | Georgina Robinson | December 23, 2010

A wristband worn by high profile sports stars that claims to improve athletic performance has been exposed as a sham by the consumer watchdog.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has ordered Power Balance Australia to refund all customers who feel they were misled by the supposed benefits of Power Balance bands.

The wristbands were touted as providing better balance, strength and flexibility by working with the wearer’s “natural energy field”.

English cricketers Kevin Pietersen and Andrew Strauss, AFL bad boy Brendan Fevola, St Kilda captain Nick Riewoldt and NRL star Benji Marshall have all been known to wear the bracelets.

But ACCC chairman Graeme Samuel said in a statement: “Power Balance has admitted that there is no credible scientific basis for the claims and therefore no reasonable grounds for making representations about the benefits of the product.

“Its conduct may have contravened the misleading and deceptive conduction section of the Trade Practices Act 1974,” Mr Samuel said.

“When a product is heavily promoted, sold at major sporting stores and worn by celebrities, consumers tend to give a certain legitimacy to the product and the representations being made.”

The bands currently sell for $29.90 on the company’s website, down from $60 earlier in the year.

Mr Samuel also warned that retailers that continue to sell the products with misleading advertising or packaging would be open to action from the ACCC.

Last month an independent review panel that deals with complaints about breaches of the therapeutic goods advertising code found that powerbalance.com.au violated the code.

Power Balance acknowledged it had breached the code and said the relevant claims had been removed from its website.

The company was also named in this year’s Shonky awards.

Consumer advocate group Choice found the bracelets were just rubber bands with plastic holograms.

“The band was tested at CHOICE under controlled lab conditions which showed it did little else than empty purchasers’ wallets,” Choice said in October.

Shonky for stronger, bendier, dumber…
Power Balance

choice.com.au

With some reluctance, we highlight the inherent shonkiness of the Power Balance bracelet – reluctance, because when Australian Skeptics demonstrated on Today Tonight that it patently didn’t do anything, subsequent sales skyrocketed: apparently any publicity is good publicity after all.

The Power Balance band is basically a rubber band bracelet with a plastic hologram in it. Sorry – a “surgical grade silicone wristband” embedded with a hologram “based on the idea of optimizing the body’s natural energy flow, similar to concepts behind many Eastern philosophies. The hologram is designed to respond to the natural energy field of the body. The Mylar material at the core has been treated with energy waves at specific frequencies…” etc, etc. All this, and backed by a money-back guarantee.

But seriously: “surgical”, “specific frequencies”, “Mylar”, “Eastern philosophies”… What’s not to believe?

We CHOICE sceptics did our own testing under controlled laboratory conditions – after all, you can’t believe everything you see on TV – and verified the Skeptics’ findings. The money-back guarantee, however, did work. The only power this bracelet seems to have, placebo effect notwithstanding, is in tipping its distributor’s bank balance well and truly into the black – they’re reportedly raking it in. So, if a fool and his money are soon parted, there are apparently plenty of fools out there – and they’re all conveniently identified with a rubber band bracelet. If you see one, offer to sell them a bridge.

This just in: the ACCC exposes Power Balance as fake.

Written by DewaKebaikan

04/01/2011 at 1:13pm

Posted in General

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